Archive

Why are public servants expendible?

May 12, 2014

Up to 7,000 families affected by job losses.

30,000 jobs at risk, unemployment tipped to rise.

I posted this originally in December but, with the budget upon us, perhaps time for a refresh.

Dramatic and it's not Holden which is 2,900 people. It's not the 10,000 jobs lost when BHP closed the steel works in Newcastle. No, it's the at least 15,000 public servant jobs tipped to go and the down-stream retail jobs at risk when those people are no longer buying goods and services.

The problem is, of course, is you won't see headlines like that. Oh no. You'll see bleeding hearts about a loss of 3,900 manufacturing jobs, but three times that amount for public servants; barely a whisper.

Why is there almost bi-partisan support for public servant retrenchment? Why are public servants treated as expendable items? Why do people seem to consider a public servant less valuable a worker than a labourer, a banker, an artist?

I've been a public servant for years and worked with them for many more than that. What I've found in most cases public servants are hard workers, with many working harder than the private sector folk I've worked for and with. In many, many cases these same public servants could earn significantly more in the private sector. But they don't. Yes there are those that "work the system"; but people who work the system are present in any large organization and it is managements job to weed them out.

Did you know a member of the Australian Public Service is a public servant 24x7 according to the code of conduct? Find me a commiserate private sector job which stipulates limitations on what you can do when your not working.

Job losses in any industry is hard, and my thoughts are with all those who lose their jobs, but quite simply I can't understand the treatment of public servants as expendable items.

Up to 7,000 families affected by job losses.

30,000 jobs at risk, unemployment tipped to rise.

Dramatic and it's not Holden which is 2,900 people. It's not the 10,000 jobs lost when BHP closed the steel works in Newcastle. No, it's the at least 12,000 public servant jobs tipped to go and the down-stream retail jobs at risk when those people are no longer buying goods and services.

The problem is, of course, is you won't see headlines like that. Oh no. You'll see bleeding hearts about a loss of 3,900 manufacturing jobs, but three times that amount for public servants; barely a whisper.

Why is there almost bi-partisan support for public servant retrenchment? Why are public servants treated as expendable items?

I've been a public servant for years and worked with them for many more than that. What I've found in most cases public servants are hard workers, with many working harder than the private sector folk I've worked for and with. In many, many cases these same public servants could earn significantly more in the private sector. But they don't. Yes there are those that "work the system"; but people like that are present in any large organization and it is managements job to weed them out. People who work the system are very much in the minority and do not reflect the organization as a whole.

Still, despite this, it is public servants that are looked down upon. Is it because their paid using government funds, which in turn originates from taxes? Well they pay tax to you know. They are held, it seems, to a higher moral standard than the private sector because of where the funds paying them come from. Did you know federally, a member of the Australian Public Service is a public servant 24x7 according to the code of conduct. Find me a commiserate private sector job which stipulates limitations on what you can do when your not on the clock.

Quite simply I can't understand the treatment of public servants as expendable items.



Tags: Rant, TL;DR
Category: Politics

blog comments powered by Disqus